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"You can run, but you can't hide, o Darth Krist-Ov! But mark my words! I will not rest until you face your destiny."
"What happened to us, my love? It could have been our destiny."
―A Jedi and Darth Krist-Ov, as portayed in a play by Risha Synata[src]

Darth Krist-Ov was a Sith Lord featured in one of actress Risha Synata's tragic plays. Performed in the Cirius system for Galactic Republic senators during the Clone Wars fought between the Republic and the Confederacy of Independent Systems, the play featured a humanoid actor portraying Krist-Ov. In the play, Krist-Ov was confronted by his lover, a Jedi who left him heartbroken. Seeing that Krist-Ov had fallen to the dark side of the Force, the Jedi aimed to make the Sith face his destiny. While the two lovers dueled, Krist-Ov took the upper hand, poising to take his lover's heart and bidding farewell. As he did so, the woebegone Jedi took the opportunity to kill him. The Jedi then laid down on the ground, Krist-Ov in hand, grieving with the question of why he had to make her kill him.

Biography[edit | edit source]

"Farewell, my love."
"Farewell."
―Krist-Ov and his lover's parting words, as portayed in a play by Synata[src]

Darth Krist-Ov was a Sith Lord featured in a play that the legendary Frenk actress Risha Synata produced. Synata's play was set at a black-and-red Sith locale, where Krist-Ov was confronted by his Jedi lover. She produced a blue lightsaber, and was determined to help realize Krist-Ov's destiny. Krist-Ov pulled out his crimson lightsaber and dueled her, asking what had happened to them and proclaiming that they could have shared a destiny. While the Jedi exclaimed that Krist-Ov took abode in the shadows, the Sith told her that she had shattered his heart and flung aside her lightsaber. As the tip of Krist-Ov's was lowered and poised to take her heart—and the Jedi told the Sith to do so—the Jedi summoned her blade while Krist-Ov bid his love farewell. Blade in hand, she closed her eyes in sadness and struck down the Sith, bidding Krist-Ov farewell in turn. The Jedi then wallowed in grief, kneeling down on the ground to hold Krit-Ov's body, questioning why he had to force her hand.[1]

Darth Krist-Ov is confronted by his Jedi lover, as portrayed in a play by Risha Synata.

Synata, who based her plays on events in the galaxy and turned them into tragedies without regard for historical accuracy, performed the Jedi in the play aboard her cruiser during the Clone Wars between the Galactic Republic and the Confederacy of Independent Systems. Soon after the Senate hostage crisis[1] in 21 BBY,[2] Republic senators were invited by Synata to her cruiser near Caamas in the Cirius system. Amongst the guests was Padmé Amidala, who took her secret lover, Jedi Knight Anakin Skywalker, for a two-day vacation aboard the ship. However, the pair were late, and thus missed the play of Darth Krist-Ov, which was performed in a theatre packed full of guests.[1]

Personality and traits[edit | edit source]

Darth Krist-Ov was portrayed in Synata's play by a male humanoid actor. The humanoid's face was painted a pale white, and he had brown hair and red eyes and tattoos. Krist-Ov wished to share a destiny with his lover, and was heartbroken by the Jedi after he himself fell to the dark side of the Force. Later, the Sith Lord attempted to claim her heart after besting her in a lightsaber duel. Before striking the killing blow, Krist-Ov spoke his farewells to his lover, which left an opening for her to kill Krist-Ov.[1]

Equipment[edit | edit source]

In Synata's play, Krist-Ov wielded a red lightsaber and wore black robes, which included a hood that concealed his face.[1]

Behind the scenes[edit | edit source]

A theatre performance of Darth Krist-Ov was featured in "Intermission, Part I," a comic written by Elsa Charretier and Pierrick Colinet and illustrated by Charretier and Sarah Stern[1] that was published in the 2018 comic issue Star Wars Adventures 12.[3]

Appearances[edit | edit source]

Notes and references[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 IDWStarWarsAdventuresLogoSmaller.png "Intermission, Part I"—Star Wars Adventures 12
  2. The Star Wars Book dates the events of the Star Wars: The Clone Wars episodes "ARC Troopers" and "Heroes on Both Sides" to 21 years before the events of Star Wars: Episode IV A New Hope, which are stated to have begun in 0 BBY in Star Wars: Galactic Atlas. Since StarWars.com Star Wars: The Clone Wars Chronological Episode Order on StarWars.com (backup link) places "Hostage Crisis" between "ARC Troopers" and "Heroes on Both Sides," the events of "Hostage Crisis," which include the Senate hostage crisis, must have taken place in 21 BBY.
  3. IDW.png Star Wars Adventures #12 on IDW Publishing's official website (backup link)
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