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"In the end, I remember KotOR as a project I enjoyed a lot."
―David Gaider[src]

David Gaider is a writer and a video game designer,[1] and was part of the design team of Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic[2]. He worked for BioWare from 1999 to 2016,[1] and he is also known to be the Lead Writer for the Dragon Age series.[3]

On Knights of the Old Republic, Gaider worked as a designer[2] and writer. He is responsible for HK-47, Carth Onasi, Korriban (and the Code of the Sith), Jolee Bindo, and part of Bastila Shan.[4] He admitted that, being mostly a fantasy writer, the game was difficult for him to work on at first. His "writer's block" disappeared after James Ohlen offered a different perspective on Star Wars, describing it not as a sci-fi world, but as a fantasy setting. Thus Gaider started taking more pleasure in his work.[5]

Though it was not stated in the game, Gaiden named Onasi's deceased wife "Morgana."[6]


Gameography[]

Year Title Notes
2003 Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic Designer

Sources[]

Notes and references[]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 LinkedIn logo.png David Gaider on LinkedIn (backup link)
  2. 2.0 2.1 Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic
  3. The man who built Thedas: Interview with David Gaider (2016-06-07). MCV/Develop. Archived from the original on January 9, 2021.
  4. TwitterLogo.svg David Gaider (@davidgaider) on Twitter: "I wrote Carth, HK-47, the Sith planet Korriban (and the Code of the Sith!), a lot of Bastila... [...] Every time I list the things I wrote on KotOR, I forget about Jolee Bindo." (backup link)
  5. TwitterLogo.svg David Gaider (@davidgaider) on Twitter: "I had an incredibly hard time working on Knights of the Old Republic, at first. I'd written fantasy for so long, I couldn't wrap my head around sci-fi. When James came to talk to me about my obvious difficulties, I remember bursting into tears. I didn't know how to write this.
    "Thing is," James advised me, "Star War IS fantasy. It has wizards and magic and monsters and heroes. It just has a science-fiction setting. If you stop thinking of it as sci-fi and write it exactly as you did fantasy, you'll be OK."
    And... that worked. The writer's block I was having just ended, and not only was I speeding along again I was having FUN. There were fantasy themes here I could explore, and issues of morality we really never addressed before." (backup link)
  6. I have a problem/question.. BioWare's KotOR forums. Archived from the original on March 14, 2009.

External links[]

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