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(Lor San Tekka and the Church of the Force)
(Description)
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{{Quote|Like me, they are all that remains of the Jedi religion.|[[Luke Skywalker]], to [[Rey]]|Star Wars: Episode VIII The Last Jedi}}
 
{{Quote|Like me, they are all that remains of the Jedi religion.|[[Luke Skywalker]], to [[Rey]]|Star Wars: Episode VIII The Last Jedi}}
 
[[File:Jedha city.jpg|thumb|Jedha City: a pilgrimage place for many religious traditions.]]
 
[[File:Jedha city.jpg|thumb|Jedha City: a pilgrimage place for many religious traditions.]]
Religion usually referred to a being's spiritual beliefs and might include some belief in an [[Netherworld of the Force|afterlife]].<ref name="Episode III">[[Star Wars: Episode III Revenge of the Sith|''Star Wars'' Episode III ''Revenge of the Sith'']]</ref> They also might include the belief in a [[god]] or [[the Force]], though this was not always the case. For instance, [[Mandalorian]] adherents to the [[Way of the Mandalore]] appeared not to show any reverence towards a god or the Force, and instead cherished weaponry, honor, and their armor.<ref name="Chapter 2">{{The Mandalorian|2}}</ref> Many religions followed some form of creed or code.<ref name="Chapter 8">{{The Mandalorian|8}}</ref> The [[Jedi Order]] adhered to its [[Jedi Code]],<ref name="Episode I">[[Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace|''Star Wars'' Episode I ''The Phantom Menace'']]</ref> while their enemies, the [[Sith]], followed the [[Code of the Sith]].<ref name="Altar of Mortis">{{TCW|Altar of Mortis (episode)}}</ref> Likewise, many religions followed a foundational set of scriptures,<ref name="TROSVD">''[[Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker: The Visual Dictionary]]''</ref> such as the [[sacred Jedi texts]] observed by members of the Jedi Order.<ref name="Episode VIII">[[Star Wars: Episode VIII The Last Jedi|''Star Wars'' Episode VIII ''The Last Jedi'']]</ref>
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Religion usually referred to a being's spiritual beliefs and might include some belief in an [[Netherworld of the Force|afterlife]].<ref name="Episode III">[[Star Wars: Episode III Revenge of the Sith|''Star Wars'' Episode III ''Revenge of the Sith'']]</ref> They also might include the belief in a [[god]] or [[the Force]], though this was not always the case.<ref name="R1Novel"/> For instance, [[Mandalorian]] adherents to the [[Way of the Mandalore]] appeared not to show any reverence towards a god or the Force, and instead cherished weaponry, honor, and their armor.<ref name="Chapter 2">{{The Mandalorian|2}}</ref> Many religions followed some form of creed or code.<ref name="Chapter 8">{{The Mandalorian|8}}</ref> The [[Jedi Order]] adhered to its [[Jedi Code]],<ref name="Episode I">[[Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace|''Star Wars'' Episode I ''The Phantom Menace'']]</ref> while their enemies, the [[Sith]], followed the [[Code of the Sith]].<ref name="Altar of Mortis">{{TCW|Altar of Mortis (episode)}}</ref> Likewise, many religions followed a foundational set of scriptures,<ref name="TROSVD">''[[Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker: The Visual Dictionary]]''</ref> such as the [[sacred Jedi texts]] observed by members of the Jedi Order.<ref name="Episode VIII">[[Star Wars: Episode VIII The Last Jedi|''Star Wars'' Episode VIII ''The Last Jedi'']]</ref> The [[Order of the Esoteric Pulsar]] followed the ''[[Book of Stars]]''.<ref name="R1Novel">[[Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (novelization)|''Rogue One: A Star Wars Story'' novelization]]</ref>
   
 
Whenever a religion fell outside the mainstream, it was often referred to as a "cult." Many of the known cults in [[the galaxy]] adhered to the [[dark side of the Force]], making following them even more stigmatized. In the aftermath of the [[Battle of Endor]], multiple Sith cults emerged to worship the deposed and presumed deceased [[Sith Lord]] [[Darth Sidious]] and his apprentice [[Darth Vader]]. Among these were the the [[Acolytes of the Beyond]], [[Alazmec of Winsit]], and the [[Sith Eternal]].<ref name="TROSVD"/> Similarly, it was possible for splinter groups to form within religions who disagreed with the orthodox members of their orders. An example of this was the [[Ordu Aspectu]], a [[Jedi]] heresy, who disagreed with the violence perpetrated by the Jedi Order.<ref name="Aphra2">''[[Doctor Aphra 2]]''</ref> However, the orthodox Jedi eventually [[Doom of the Ordu Aspectu|destroyed]] the sect.<ref name="Aphra6">''[[Doctor Aphra 6]]''</ref>
 
Whenever a religion fell outside the mainstream, it was often referred to as a "cult." Many of the known cults in [[the galaxy]] adhered to the [[dark side of the Force]], making following them even more stigmatized. In the aftermath of the [[Battle of Endor]], multiple Sith cults emerged to worship the deposed and presumed deceased [[Sith Lord]] [[Darth Sidious]] and his apprentice [[Darth Vader]]. Among these were the the [[Acolytes of the Beyond]], [[Alazmec of Winsit]], and the [[Sith Eternal]].<ref name="TROSVD"/> Similarly, it was possible for splinter groups to form within religions who disagreed with the orthodox members of their orders. An example of this was the [[Ordu Aspectu]], a [[Jedi]] heresy, who disagreed with the violence perpetrated by the Jedi Order.<ref name="Aphra2">''[[Doctor Aphra 2]]''</ref> However, the orthodox Jedi eventually [[Doom of the Ordu Aspectu|destroyed]] the sect.<ref name="Aphra6">''[[Doctor Aphra 6]]''</ref>

Revision as of 01:37, December 29, 2019

"I'm a Mandalorian. Weapons are part of my religion!"
Din Djarin[src]

A religion described an organized belief system held by many beings in the galaxy. Some religions were labeled as cults.

Description

"Like me, they are all that remains of the Jedi religion."
Luke Skywalker, to Rey[src]
Jedha city

Jedha City: a pilgrimage place for many religious traditions.

Religion usually referred to a being's spiritual beliefs and might include some belief in an afterlife.[1] They also might include the belief in a god or the Force, though this was not always the case.[2] For instance, Mandalorian adherents to the Way of the Mandalore appeared not to show any reverence towards a god or the Force, and instead cherished weaponry, honor, and their armor.[3] Many religions followed some form of creed or code.[4] The Jedi Order adhered to its Jedi Code,[5] while their enemies, the Sith, followed the Code of the Sith.[6] Likewise, many religions followed a foundational set of scriptures,[7] such as the sacred Jedi texts observed by members of the Jedi Order.[8] The Order of the Esoteric Pulsar followed the Book of Stars.[2]

Whenever a religion fell outside the mainstream, it was often referred to as a "cult." Many of the known cults in the galaxy adhered to the dark side of the Force, making following them even more stigmatized. In the aftermath of the Battle of Endor, multiple Sith cults emerged to worship the deposed and presumed deceased Sith Lord Darth Sidious and his apprentice Darth Vader. Among these were the the Acolytes of the Beyond, Alazmec of Winsit, and the Sith Eternal.[7] Similarly, it was possible for splinter groups to form within religions who disagreed with the orthodox members of their orders. An example of this was the Ordu Aspectu, a Jedi heresy, who disagreed with the violence perpetrated by the Jedi Order.[9] However, the orthodox Jedi eventually destroyed the sect.[10]

Many religions had sites scattered throughout the galaxy that were holy or sacred to them. Jedha City was a gathering place for a plethora of the galaxy's Force-based religions up until its destruction by the first Death Star.[2] Ilum was a sacred planet for the Jedi Order, where they would harvest kyber crystals for their lightsabers;[11] and Moraband was a dark but sacred world to the Sith and was home to their burial grounds.[12]

Appearances

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Sources

Notes and references

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